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6 Best Ukuleles: A Guide for Beginners

Best Ukulele
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Updated November 2019
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6 Ukuleles

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WHY THIS ONE? BUYING OPTIONS
Kala KA-15S UkuleleKala KA-15S Ukulele

Great craftsmanship and setup, mahogany top, and comes with high quality Aquila Nylgut strings. It has a sweet tone, and for the ridiculously low price it's a perfect way to get into the ukulele. Read more

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB
Epiphone Les Paul Acoustic/Electric UkuleleEpiphone Les Paul Acoustic/Electric Ukulele

A great sounding uke with some serious character and looks. This concert size uke sounds good, the details are well thought out, and it's acoustic/electric which means you can plug it into an amp or PA to play live. Read more

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB
Oscar Schmidt OU5 Concert UkuleleOscar Schmidt OU5 Concert Ukulele

Once you finish being mesmerized by its gorgeous finish, you'll be impressed the warm and rich tone of the Oscar Schmidt OU5 Concert Uke. We wish it was made of solid koa wood as opposed to laminate, but laminate keeps the price lower. When you're ready to move past beginner/budget ukes, take a close look at this one. Read more

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB
Luna Mahogany Series Tattoo Concert UkuleleLuna Mahogany Series Tattoo Concert Ukulele

This concert size uke has a beautiful tattoo design and features mahogany top and sides. Considering it's under $100, it is set up very well and the fit and finish are impressive. Most importantly, it sounds very nice. Read more

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB
Godin Guitars 36080 UkuleleGodin Guitars 36080 Ukulele

A high-end tenor size uke that looks as good as it sounds. It's more electric than acoustic; It's missing a sound hole, so it's not as loud and resonant as 100% acoustic ukes. The electronics allow you to plug into an amp or PA, where this ukulele truly shines. If you record or perform you'll be blown away by its quality. Read more

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB
Cordoba 15CM UkuleleCordoba 15CM Ukulele

The Cordoba 15CM is sure to please anyone looking for their first ukulele or an upgrading from a lesser instrument. The 15CM provides the best performance per the price point and is durable enough to last a lifetime. Read more

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

6 Best Ukuleles


Cordoba 15CM Concert Ukulele

Cordoba 15CM Ukulele

Size:Concert

The Cordoba 15CM will thrill most people looking for their first violin. It sounds terrific, especially when considering the price, and feels like a quality instrument.

The 15CM is a concert sized uke that is constructed from a laminate mahogany. Despite being laminate rather than hard wood, it sounds very pleasing. The top laminate is a bit thicker than your average solid top, and it has a nice percussive character if you tap it. The tone is a pleasant chiming tone that is very representative of a versatile ukulele. The sustain is good and the fretboard feels very solid. You can hear the CM15 in action here.

It is a satin finish with an abalone rosette and cream binding. This straightforward appearance gives the Cordoba CM15 a no nonsense and honest, if slightly plain, look. The tuners are silver with pearl buttons and feel decent, if not outstanding.

The setup out of the box was great and we did not need to adjust anything to get nice tones. The Aquila strings are a nice touch and reinforce that this is a quality instrument rather than a toy, which can be an issue below this price point.

Bottom Line: If you are looking for your first quality ukulele or are moving up from a lesser beginner option, you will be happy with the Cordoba 15CM. The tone and feel of this ukulele are above its price point and the quality construction make it an instrument that you can play for a lifetime.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

Kala KA-15S Mahogany Soprano Ukulele

Kala KA-15S Ukulele

Size: Soprano

The value you get from the entire Kala KA-15 series is nothing short of amazing at this price point. With the Kala KA-15S in particular, you’ll find a quality mahogany instrument that is very playable.

At the price point of the Kala KA-15S, we half expected to find a instrument that had cheese graters for frets (cheaper instruments with shoddy craftsmanship will leave sharp edges where the metal frets meets the wood of the neck, shredding your hands). However, the fit and finish of this Kala ukulele was really an unexpected and pleasant surprise. The setup was excellent on our uke straight out of the box, making it very user-friendly to pick up and start strumming. And speaking of strumming, the KA-15S comes strung with very high quality Aquila Nylgut strings, which are some of the best ukulele strings around.

The KA-15S sports a mahogany top and sides, which are satin finished. The satin finish on our model was really well done and gives the instrument an understated vibe where the grain of the wood and the pores are still visible, but the ukulele has a subtle styling appeal and has a vintage simplicity about it. The neck feels great and the 12 brass frets are fit into the rosewood fingerboard well. The neck features position markers along the side where the fretboard is also marked at the 5th, 7th, and 10th frets. The nut works very well, and is made of a plastic material that kept the strings in place and avoided intonation issues. The one area we think could be notably improved is the open geared tuners. If we’re being picky, the tuners feel a bit cheap and second class. It’s not that they don’t work, but the pearl buttons feel a bit plastic-like. Having said that, we feel a bit odd complaining about that because of where this instrument is priced, and overall, the fit and finish are a superb value for the money.

The sound of the KA-15S is where the instrument shines. As a soprano, it has the classic ukulele sound and excels at having an even and balanced tone. And, with as good as it sounds and feels in hand, you’re still not afraid to take it to the beach or use it around the campfire because it is so accessible.

One of the most popular ukulele players on the planet right now - Vance Joy, who you might recognize from his hit Riptide - plays Kala ukes exclusively.

Vance Joy with his Kala ukulele

Bottom Line: This day and age, getting a very high quality acoustic stringed instrument at a super affordable price is tough. The Kala KA-15S Mahogany Soprano Ukulele manages to completely blow expectations out of the water. It’s simply an amazing value for the money. Professional quality, fit, and finish + crisp and rich tone + an unbelievably low price tag = you really can’t go wrong, whether you’re a beginner who’s uke-curious or a seasoned guitarist jumping into the wonderful world of the ukulele.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

Epiphone Les Paul Acoustic/Electric Ukulele

Epiphone Les Paul Acoustic/Electric Ukulele

Size: Concert

With the Epiphone Les Paul Acoustic/Electric Ukulele, the Gibson brand has made a ukulele that’s not only painted to look like the venerable Les Paul, it actually feels like you are holding a miniature Les Paul.

From the way it’s packaged when it arrives at your doorstep, all the way to strumming your first chord on it, the entire experience of this ukulele is quality. Epiphone even includes a very high quality, thick gig bag that feels like it will protect your instrument, which is a nice little bonus. The construction is top notch, which is the quality you would expect when paying a little more for the Epiphone name. The body is mahogany, and the top is a AAA grade flame maple top. It comes in two finishes - Cherry Burst and Vintage Sunburst, and both are very attractive.

In terms of the little details in the fit and the finish, we’re very happy with this ukulele. The geared tuners are pretty decent, and most importantly precise. You get 19 frets, constructed of silver nickel. Epiphone even thought to include strap buttons/holders, so you can attach a normal guitar strap and rock out with your mini Les Paul uke. Since this is in fact an acoustic-electric ukulele, it has a built in piezo pickup, which means you can hook it up to an acoustic guitar amp or PA system for playing live (or recording).

The Epiphone Les Paul Acoustic/Electric Ukulele sounds pretty great.It’s actually a bit quieter than we expected, likely because we’re comparing it to an all-acoustic ukulele (the sound box on this one is a little smaller). Still, the tone is sweet and can even be described as delicate, which is a good quality for a ukulele to have.

Bottom Line: The Epiphone Les Paul Acoustic/Electric Ukulele costs about twice as much as the Kala KA-15S. Is it worth it? It depends how much you care about having a few specific things: a piezo pickup, an included gig bag, the Les Paul styling, and of course the Epiphone brand name on the headstock. We have to admit, the Les Paul styling gives it a very cool feel. It also helps that the fit, finish, and tone are all pretty great.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

Oscar Schmidt OU5 Concert Ukulele

Oscar Schmidt OU5 Concert Ukulele

Size: Concert

The Oscar Schmidt OU5 Concert Ukulele is both gorgeous to behold, and sounds just like a quality ukulele should.

The most immediately striking thing about the OU5 is how beautiful the finish on it is. Oscar Schmidt used koa tonewood for the sides and top, which has an extremely attractive grain and pattern. It’s hard to find an instrument in this price range that looks as stunning as this one. The OU5 is a koa laminate, as opposed to being solid koa. A solid koa wood ukulele would generally sell for three times as much as this one costs. On the plus side, the glossy finish looks and feels nice.

The OU5 is very well put together. Right out of the box the one we received was set up very well. The Grover chrome tuners are a nice touch, and after the string “break-in” period, it stays in tune quite well. Remember, new nylon strings take some time to stretch out and get settled, so it’s normal for your OU5 ukulele to not stay in tune very well during the first few days.

Sound-wise, the Oscar Schmidt OU5 sounds like a proper concert-sized ukulele should. It has a very distinctive brightness, with the notes ringing out very clearly. While a solid wood koa uke would probably sound a little mellower and benefit from the ageing effect of the wood, the OU5 is no slouch; it has all the warmth and resonance you could ask for in an ukulele in its price range.

Bottom Line: The Oscar Schmidt OU5 Concert Ukulele hits a really nice sweet spot of quality and features. An all-solid-wood construction would be nice, but as we mentioned a solid koa uke would be significantly pricier. The great thing is that you get the full benefit of how good koa looks; this is truly a stunning looking instrument, and it’s very fun and easy to play.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

Luna Guitars Tattoo Concert Ukulele

Luna Mahogany Series Tattoo Concert Ukulele Size: Concert

Featuring a unique “tattooed” aesthetic, the Luna Guitars Tattoo Concert Ukulele offers a great value to the budding ukulele player and experienced musician alike. This ukulele features a mahogany top, mahogany back and sides, as well as a mahogany neck with a rosewood fretboard.

This design is based on a Hawaiian turtle (honu), a symbol of longevity and endurance rendered in a Polynesian tattoo style. The fret markers are stylized sharks teeth.

This ukulele absolutely oozes style and character. The construction is mahogany, and there’s a nice richness to the wood grain. Believe us when we say it looks much better in person than it does in photos. All in all, it’s very well made considering we’re looking at a sub-$100 price point - the fit and finish is pretty impressive, particularly around the neck and frets (arguably the most important part for playability). Speaking of frets, here you have 18 of them, which is a nice extension from a smaller soprano ukulele.

This Luna uke definitely gets points for having a “ready to play” setup from the moment you take it out of the box. It comes strung from the factory with Aquila strings, which are some of the best ukulele strings around. It also comes with a gig bag, so you can keep this ukulele’s beautiful finish protected from dust, dings, and scratches.

The Luna has a very nice tone. It definitely sounds better than what you may think for a ukulele priced this affordably. In fact, you can hear this sweet-sounding ukulele for yourself on season 11 of the talent show America’s Got Talent, the eventual winner Grace VanderWaal sang and played her Luna Tattoo Concert ukulele.

Bottom Line: There’s an awful lot to like about this Luna ukulele. The engraved tattoo design sets it apart from other ukuleles, it sounds very nice, it’s set up extremely well and is easy to play, and surprisingly comes in at under $100!

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

Godin MultiUke

Godin Guitars 36080 Ukulele

Size: Tenor

Handcrafted in Canada, the Godin MultiUke is a great option for those looking for a professional quality instrument. The MultiUke comes with either a solid spruce top for a brighter voicing (the sunburst finish) or cedar top for a warmer voicing (natural finish). It has a chambered mahogany body, and most importantly it is not a 100% acoustic ukulele; it has an onboard pickup and preamp with EQ adjustment, and truly shines when it’s plugged into an amp.

This Godin ukulele is a premium instrument, and its price tag reflects that. You’re definitely in pro territory here, and with an ukulele this finely crafted you won’t find yourself needing to upgrade anytime soon (perhaps ever). The setup on the one we tried was absolutely flawless - the action was low without any annoying buzz, and the perfectly radiused fretboard has a superb fit and finish. It not only feels high-end, but it looks the part too. This Godin uke is like a modern piece of art, and there are no flaws or imperfections on the finish to speak of. Godin is quite consistent with setting these up very well at the factory, so when you buy it you’re getting something you can pick up and play with no issues. After all, if you pay for quality, you should expect your experience to be great start to finish, and this Godin ukulele does not disappoint. It comes strung with D’Addario Titanium Ukulele strings, which are very nicely matched to a tenor ukulele.

This is truly an acoustic/electric ukulele, and in fact, it might be slightly more electric than it is acoustic. You’ll notice it’s missing a sound hole in the center of the body, and instead has onboard slider adjustments for volume, treble, mid, and bass. When played acoustically (i.e. not plugged in), don’t get us wrong, it still sounds beautiful - it’s just not as loud and resonant as 100% acoustic ukes. Some users describe it as “a bit thin,” and “rather quiet and kind of neutral tone-wise.” If playing by yourself it puts out ample volume, but if you’re playing with other fully acoustic instruments, the Godin might have a tough time keeping pace with the volume. We plugged it into a couple of acoustic guitar amps (a Fishman and a Fender) to test out its “plugged in” tone, and we were blown away.

The onboard EQ works very well, and allows you to sculpt your tone any way you see fit. Overall, the pickup system is very well done - it’s clear, loud, and we didn’t experience any feedback.

Bottom Line: The downside of this tenor size Godin ukulele is its price tag; it’s not exactly cheap. However, with acoustic handcrafted instruments, you often get what you pay for. Here you’re getting a ukulele with solid wood back, sides, and top, an almost flawless setup, and a state of the art pickup system. Put all of that together, and you get a ukulele that plays wonderfully, whether in your bedroom or the stage.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

Ukulele Sizes

One of the most important factors affecting a ukuleles sound is size. Ukuleles come in a range of sizes. There are four main types of ukuleles, from smallest to largest: soprano, concert, tenor, and baritone.

Types of Ukuleles

Soprano: A soprano is what people typically think of when they picture a ukulele in their heads. Also referred to as a standard ukulele by some manufacturers, it is the smallest of the most popular variants, which gives it the brightest tone that typically cuts through the song in that characteristically ukulele fashion. Typical length is 21”, with 10-12 frets, making it very comfortable to play for smaller hands and kids.

Concert: Concert sized ukuleles are generally more comfortable for full-grown adults. This size and larger are more comfortable to hold and play for larger hands. Typical length is 23”, with 15-18 frets.

Tenor: The bigger the instrument the deeper the tone. The tenor will fit in between the concert and baritone, and be more bass heavy than the concert and soprano. Ukuleles sized tenor and smaller typically utilize the same tuning. Typical length is 26”, with 17-19 frets.

Baritone: The biggest ukulele, the baritone body size is generally tuned a fifth lower. The voicing of the instrument also sports characteristics similar to that of a classical acoustic guitar. Typical length is 29”, with 18-21 frets.


Ukulele Terminology

Familiarizing yourself with the various terms and features specific to ukuleles will help you make a more informed buying decision. Let’s define some common things you might see:

Parts of a Ukulele:

Parts of a Ukulele

Solid Top/Back/Sides: When a ukulele is advertised as sporting a solid top (or a solid top, back, and sides) it means that that section is made out of solid wood as opposed to laminate. Generally, a solid wood instrument is considered to have a richer tone than its laminate counterparts (the top is primarily responsible for the tone of the ukulele, so at the very least look for that to be made of solid wood). Another benefit of solid wood is that, like a good wine, it becomes better as it ages. Over the years the instrument will sound sweeter, richer, warmer, and more complex.

Acoustic/Electric: When a ukulele is advertised as being acoustic/electric, it has a pickup (generally a piezo) that allows the instrument to be amplified. If you intend to play live, investing in an acoustic/electric ukulele might make sense. That way, using a guitar cable you can plug it into an acoustic guitar amp or PA system. If you don’t amplify your ukulele and play along with other instruments, you run the risk of not being able to hear the ukulele over other louder instruments.


What Does A Ukulele Do?

Generally, the ukulele is used to either provide extra texture to a song or to give a song a more Hawaiian feel. Because the instrument is tuned in the same intervals as the top four strings of a guitar (top meaning highest pitched in this context) the instrument can easily be picked up by the average guitar player. However, there are a few extra considerations involved in choosing a ukulele because of the different mechanics at play in the instrument.

Similar to the mandolin, it takes a lot of care on the part of the manufacturer to build a good ukulele because of the instrument’s small size. The overall size of a ukulele is a lot smaller than a guitar, so in order to have a similar amount of response across the frequency spectrum a ukulele actually needs to be made of better quality wood than the average guitar.

Remember that a ukulele is never going to reach the volume of the average dreadnought acoustic. If you plan on jamming with your buddies, you’re going to need to invest in an acoustic-electric instrument.

Eddie Vedder with his ukulele


How Much Should I Spend on a Ukulele?

If all you’re looking to do is add some ukulele sound to your songs you really don’t have to spend a lot. For that purpose, you can easily get a useable instrument for under $200.

However, for those of you who want to pursue the ukulele seriously (and more power to you for doing so!) you’re going to want to shell out a bit more. We’ve found that you don’t start getting a truly great ukulele sound until you hit the $400-ish mark, which is admittedly still pretty cheap when you consider how much time you’ll be spending with the instrument.


Tuning Your Ukulele

Just like you would any acoustic stringed instrument, you need to tune your ukulele. The tuning of the four strings is generally the same for soprano, concert, and tenor ukuleles (with tenor ukuleles you can opt for a high G or low G). Baritone ukuleles are tuned a fifth lower. Here is what the common tunings look like:

Soprano: G4-C4-E4-A4
Concert: G4-C4-E4-A4
Tenor: G4-C4-E4-A4 (for a high G), G3-C4-E4-A4 (for a low G)
Baritone: D3-G3-B3-E4

If you have no idea what any of that means, don’t worry, it’s simple enough! Once you get your ukulele and start playing it’s very easy to figure out. Both when starting out and even when you’re more experienced, it’s helpful to use a clip-on ukulele tuner. “Clip-on” simply means that the tuner physically clips onto the headstock of your uke, and as you hit each string the tuner shows you how close you are to the correct pitch. Clip-on tuners make tuning extremely fast and easy. One of the highest rated and most recommended ones is the Snark SN6X Clip-On Tuner for Ukulele, which has gotten hundreds of good reviews and costs about $10. It’s a very worthy investment to go along with your brand new ukulele.

Also, a quick word of caution with your ukulele strings. Nylon strings are very commonly used on ukuleles, and they have a break-in period that can last a few days. After receiving their new ukulele, some people complain that it has trouble staying in tune, and tend to blame the tuners. In reality, all guitar strings - but nylon strings in particular - take some time to stretch out, and the unfortunate side effect of them stretching out is your uke going out of tune. If you experience this, just keep tuning your ukulele as you normally would, and trust that the strings will adjust after a couple of days.


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About the authors
Mason Hoberg

Mason is a freelance music gear writer that contributes to Equipboard, Reverb, TuneCore, Music Aficionado, and more. He plays the guitar and mandolin and resides in Wyoming. Read more


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