EQUIPBOARD GEAR REVIEWS

Top Boost Pedals - Updated 2019

Best Boost Pedals
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Updated October 2019
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8 Pedals

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WHY THIS ONE? BUYING OPTIONS
MXR M133 Micro AmpMXR M133 Micro Amp

It's nearly fully transparent, only adding a hint of brightness when engaged. It's affordable, and a mainstay on the pedalboards of touring pros like Alex Turner, John Frusciante, Flea, and Jack White.

  • Best under $100

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB
Xotic Effects EP BoosterXotic Effects EP Booster

If it's magic you want, look no further than the Xotic EP Booster. It colors your tone a bit, but in a very positive way, making your overdrive tone sound thicker & creamier. A versatile and perfect "always-on" boost pedal.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB
Electro-Harmonix LPB-1 Linear Power Booster PreampElectro-Harmonix LPB-1 Linear Power Booster Preamp

While it colors your tone with a perceptible mid-range bump, it's hard to find a boost pedal that's a better value for the money. EHX quality, U.S.A. made, perfect if you don't want to spend a ton on a boost.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB
ZVex Vexter Series Super Hard OnZVex Vexter Series Super Hard On

The boutique ZVex Super Hard On is a bit of the unconventional choice for a boost for adventurous guitarists. It's a transparent boost for the most part (adds a bit of richness & sparkle), crackles by design when you adjust it, and has a ton of gain on tap. Count on ZVex to make any pedalboard more interesting.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB
Xotic Effects RC BoosterXotic Effects RC Booster

One of the cleanest clean boosts around. The Treble and Bass knobs give you an extra level of control as compared to other boosts. Superb Xotic quality, true bypass, perfect as a pristine clean boost or an "always on" pedal. This is a fantastic choice, provided you can swallow the slightly higher price tag.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB
MXR MC401 Boost/Line DriverMXR MC401 Boost/Line Driver

As simple as they come. Transparently boosts from 0 to +20dB.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB
Keeley Katana Clean Boost PedalKeeley Katana Clean Boost Pedal

High-headroom boutique pedal that offers both transparent and "overdriven tube grit" boost options.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB
TC Electronic Spark Mini BoosterTC Electronic Spark Mini Booster

Nice, affordable & compact transparent boost (0 to +20db) that can give you a momentary boost if you hold down the footswitch.

  • Best under $50

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

Clean boosts are probably some of the more useful pedals that we as guitar players can own, however, finding a quality clean boost can be extremely challenging. Some clean boost pedals actually aren’t very clean at all and add too much distortion when you try to turn up the volume knob, and others are noisy, or boost unwanted frequencies. All of the pedals listed here are low noise, and do not boost harsh frequencies, or muddy your tone.

The 8 Best Clean Boosts

MXR M-133 Micro Amp

» It's nearly fully transparent (only adding a hint of brightness), affordable, and a solid choice.

MXR M133 Micro Amp

If you’ve done any sort of prior research on the best guitar boost pedals, you’ll recognize the MXR M-133 Micro Amp . Its ease of use, build quality, low price tag, and its effect on your tone are just a few reasons why this pedal is so popular. Let’s explore.

Right out of the box, you notice how the MXR M-133 Micro Amp just feels like a workhorse. The MXR build quality is evident with its all-metal case. This pedal has been around for a while and has definitely proven it can stand a good bit of abuse. It has a single on/off, and features true bypass so your tone won’t be affected when the pedal is off. It has a 1/4” input and output, and an input for a 9V DC power supply right next to the 1/4” input on the side of the pedal (you can also unscrew the bottom and power it with a 9V battery). The only way to tweak this pedal is the single large GAIN knob, which - you guessed it - adjusts the gain. MXR also includes a large rubber washer that goes over the knob, for better grip and easier operation in case you want to manipulate it with your foot while you’re playing. This is a nice little plus in our book.

The MXR Micro Amp is a transparent, simple, effective clean boost. While many describe the MXR Micro Amp as “totally clean” and “totally transparent,” with the Gain knob all the way down, there’s an ever-so-slight increase in your high end frequencies. Fortunately, this is mostly a change for the better, as it just seems like you get a little more crispness and clarity when this pedal is on. Another way to think of it is that the Micro Amp adds just a bit of brightness.

We tested the Micro Amp at the start of the chain, before and after dirt pedals, at the end of the chain, and in the effects loop. When placed at the front of the chain, it is indeed very transparent. It tends to show its character a little more when placed around your distortion and overdrive pedals. In short, you’ll definitely want to experiment with placement. One thing is for sure - no matter where in the chain you place it, the MXR Micro Amp is easy to use and very effective. Whether you play just lead or both rhythm and lead, this boost pedal is extremely useful.

We tried the Micro Amp with both single coil pickups and humbuckers, and found it’s very successful at compensating for the difference in pickups, providing more “bite” when you need it, resulting in a stronger, fatter tone. After testing out its range, we found ourselves loving the Micro Amp’s effect on our tone with the Gain knob set just a hair over 12 o’clock.

Bottom Line: If you only paid attention to the MXR M-133 Micro Amp when shopping for a boost pedal, rest assured you’re looking at a great one. Judging by the amount of pro guitarists that depend on it, we’re very confident in saying this is the most popular boost. Here are several that consider the MXR Micro Amp very important to their sound: Alex Turner, John Frusciante, Flea (who uses it when he needs that little “extra bit” when slapping or doing a lead part on the bass), Jack White (not only does Jack White have one on his pedalboard, but has rigged up a couple guitars to have a Micro Amp inside of them), Kings of Leon’s Matthew and Caleb Followill, Nick Valensi, Paul Banks of Interpol fame... and that’s only to name a small fraction.

The MXR Micro Amp is versatile despite being so simple to operate. It can be transparent, but one of the best features is that when the Micro Amp is turned up high and adding a bit of overdrive, it adds a very pleasant tone, as opposed to sounding harsh or muddy. And finally, you’ll appreciate how MXR has priced it quite affordably.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

Xotic Effects EP Booster

» Makes your tone thicker & creamier, a versatile and perfect "always-on" boost.

Xotic Effects EP Booster

The chief rival to the MXR Micro Amp is the Xotic Effects EP Booster. Now, it’s important to know that pitting the MXR Micro Amp against the Xotic EP is not exactly an apples-to-apples comparison. Yes, they are both boost pedals, but the Xotic EP is a slightly different beast, which becomes evident when you see how people describe its effect on their tone. It’s also a bit more expensive than the MXR Micro Amp.

As far as the way it looks, feels, and functions, it’s actually fairly similar to the MXR. The Xotic EP Booster is slimmer, which is something to consider if you’re very tight on space on your pedalboard. The build quality is second to none; this little box feels like it could withstand lots of use and abuse. Like the Micro Amp, its appearance on so many pedalboards of the pros is a testament to its tour-worthiness. Functionally, you’ve got an on/off footswitch (true bypass), 1/4” input and output, an input for a power supply on the back of the pedal (it can be powered with 9V DC or 18V DC, which actually slightly affects the tone), and a single big boost knob atop the pedal with 20dB of gain on tap. Again, dead simple operation. Removing the panel on the underside of the EP Booster reveals a slot for a 9V battery, and two small DIP switches, which affect the character of the pedal (more on these shortly).

The Xotic EP Booster is in actuality NOT designed to be fully transparent, and this is largely due to it being based on the preamp section of a vintage EP-3 Echoplex (made famous by Jimmy Page, Eddie Van Halen, and many more). While the MXR Micro Amp can be considered more of a utilitarian, straightforward clean boost, the Xotic EP Booster is sought after more because of a certain extra “sparkle” it adds to your tone. It’s actually quite entertaining to see all the superlatives people use when attempting to describe this pedal - warming, thickening, punch, creamy, shimmering, bigger, stronger. Lots of owners of the Xotic EP simply call it magic:

“...you may be led to believe that if you peeked inside the pedal, you'd find transistors made from unicorn horn in there. Well, maybe they are. This pedal is that good... even if you turn the knob all the way down, you still get the magic”

In our play testing, we can attest to the fact that there’s a very subtle yet pleasant coloration to your tone. But make no mistake; you can absolutely use this pedal as a transparent-ish clean boost. The 20dB of gain are just enough, whether you’re running the EP Booster before your overdrive/distortion to push them, or after to “enlarge” your sound. The two available DIP switches give this boost pedal a leg up in the customizability department. One switch is a Bass Boost, and the other is a Bright switch. Both of them set to off is known as the Vintage setting, which brings out the mellower side of the EP Booster. Just the Bright switch on is the default setting, and the extra boost it provides in the high end of the spectrum definitely helps if your guitar and amp combo is “darker.” Flipping on the Bass Boost DIP switch helps fatten up single coils. Your milage may vary, and part of the fun is discovering how the EP Booster will work best within your setup.

Bottom Line: It’s difficult to say anything bad about this boost pedal. In fact, the consensus is that no matter what your existing gear is, the Xotic EP Booster will improve your tone.

This might not be the best pedal for you if you’re looking for the most transparent clean boost money can buy. However, it can actually be very complementary to a cleaner boost like the MXR Micro Amp. We would recommend using the Micro Amp as the clean boost for lead playing, and have the Xotic EP Booster on your board as an always-on pedal to add that extra sparkle and sweetness (a.k.a. the magic) to your tone. One downside is that it’s pricier than an MXR Micro Amp, but given that it’s an instant “tone improver” and can make a lifeless amp sound immediately better, its price tag might be justified. Famous users include Josh Klinghoffer, Mike McCready, Paul Banks, John Butler, Foo Fighters guitarist Chris Shiflett, and many many more.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

Electro-Harmonix LPB-1

» With a perceptible mid-range bump, it's hard to find a boost pedal that's a better value for the money.

Electro-Harmonix LPB-1 Linear Power Booster Preamp

The Electro-Harmonix LPB-1 (Linear Power Booster) is extremely simple - one switch, and one Boost knob. If you’re after a boost pedal from a very reputable manufacturer and don’t want to break the bank, the EHX LPB-1 is an outstanding value for the money.

What’s great about the LPB-1 is that despite this being the budget option, you’re getting Electro-Harmonix quality and reliability. This is a solidly built little metal box, made in the U.S.A., it’s true bypass, and comes with a 9V battery included (if you use a power supply it requires your standard 9V DC). Being a “Nano” pedal, its small footprint means you won’t be giving up a bunch of pedalboard real estate.

If you’re just getting into the world of boost guitar pedals, you could stop reading here and go order one of these for as little as they cost, and you would be making a good decision. Is the LPB-1 a completely transparent boost? No. Is it perfect? Well, that’s subjective, but we’ll err on the side of no. However given its price tag, you could easily test it out with your guitar(s), amp(s), and other pedals, and see how it plays with your setup. Remember, whether you’re getting a noisy budget boost pedal or a pristine high-end boutique boost, how you incorporate it into your rig will make a significant difference on your final tonal result. The point is, this is a great intro boost pedal, if you’re trying one out for the first time.

Now, for you players that are more familiar with boost pedals and need to know all the nuances of your gear, it’s important to know that the Electro-Harmonix LPB-1 does color your tone a bit. Whereas the MXR Micro Amp can be considered ever so slightly bright and adds a bit of sparkle, the LPB-1 is more on the “dark” side of the tone spectrum. But who’s to say that’s a bad thing? What one guitarist calls undesired tone coloration, another could call warmth and fullness.

We were lucky to try this pedal side by side with the MXR Micro Amp, and when A/B testing our tone between the two pedals, we definitely heard the difference. It should also be noted that the MXR has a bit more gain on tap than the EHX. You might find the tone coloration of the LPB-1 works well if your amp is naturally brighter.

Bottom Line: If you’re a guitarist in search of an inexpensive boost pedal, you’re lucky - it’s not often the budget option is of this caliber. For the budget-priced option to make it to third place based on overall number of recommendations is impressive, and speaks to the quality of this pedal. It’s tried and true, and while it colors your sound by slightly boosting the mids and perhaps even taking off a little bit of the high end, it has the potential to work great within your setup. It’s widely agreed upon that the MXR Micro Amp is cleaner and more transparent, but at this price point give the Electro-Harmonix LPB-1 a try. Don’t like it? Gift it to a friend in need of a boost!

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

ZVex Super Hard On

» Adds a bit of richness & sparkle, crackles by design, and has a ton of gain on tap.

ZVex Vexter Series Super Hard On

You can always count on ZVex to inject some serious character in even the most basic guitar effects pedals. The ZVex Super Hard On pedal (or SHO for short) is quite a unique boost pedal.

There are two versions of the ZVex Super Hard On. The hand painted version of the SHO is the more expensive of the two, and the Vexter Series version uses silk-screened graphics and is significantly cheaper. Still not cheap by any means, but you can save a lot of cash going with the Vexter Series. Functionally, they are exactly the same.

This is a boutique pedal through and through. Build quality is top notch, and both the hand painted and silk-screened graphics look great and will inject some personality into your pedal setup. Like the other boost pedals we cover in this guide, operation of the ZVex Super Hard On is very simple. The footswitch in the middle switches the effect on and off, and like any good boutique pedal this one is True Bypass. A single large knob is responsible for the amount of boost, and its CRACKLE OKAY label is quite unique. This boost pedal is based on the input of a classic 1960’s recording console, which crackled when you adjusted it. The SHO mimics this, and crackles when the knob is turned. It has a single 1/4” input, and dual outputs (useful if you want to send the outputs to two separate amps, or split your signal some other way).

Sound-wise, the ZVex Super Hard On is a transparent clean boost, but can drive the front-end of your tube amp quite hard when you crank it. It feels like it has more gain on tap than the MXR Micro amp and Xotic EP Booster. Like the EP Booster, this is a great “always on” pedal, as on the lower settings it adds a sort of subtle richness and sparkle to your tone. Turning the Crackle Okay knob to anything past halfway will really punish your amp, and result in a thick overdriven tone. As we were testing it we dialed it to about 30% and found that provided the ideal amount of boost.

Bottom Line: So, should you choose the ZVez SHO over the Xotic EP Booster or MXR Micro Amp? This is a difficult question, since all of these are great boost pedals and have their place on the pedalboard. The ZVex SHO is more transparent than the EP Booster. The Xotic is known to affect your tone and thicken things up a bit, whereas the Super Hard On introduces some sparkle on the high end at best, but overall does not really mess with your tone. Versus the MXR Micro Amp, it’s almost too close to call. Both are excellent boosters, and it will come down to price, brand preference, and if you’re drawn to more unique boutique pedals or not. The ZVex Super Hard On is oozing with personality, from its hand-painted looks to the crackling of the knob when you turn it. It’s transparent, and does the job it’s supposed to do very, very well.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

Xotic Effects RC Booster

» Superb quality, true bypass, perfect as a pristine clean boost or an "always on" pedal.

Xotic Effects RC Booster

Xotic makes some of the best overdrive/boost pedals out there today, and it’s no surprise that a second pedal from them rounds out our best boost pedals list. The Xotic Effects RC Booster is one pedal that is on almost every Nashville Session Guitarist’s pedal board. Guys like Brent Mason, and Kenny Greenberg both use them, and there’s a good reason for that. The RC Booster is probably the cleanest clean boost that you will come across, and it hardly colors the tone at all (the RC actually stands for “Real Clean”).

Immediately you’ll notice the RC Booster is not a simple one-knob-and-done pedal like the other boost pedals on our list. The RC has four knobs to shape your tone with - Gain, Volume, and two controls for EQ, Treble and Bass. We’ll get to the operation of those shortly. In terms of build quality, Xotic makes some tough pedals. The RC Booster looks and feels rugged; it’s absolutely a tour-worthy pedal. You have a 1/4“ input and output, and the pedal can be easily powered by either a 9V battery (which you can access by removing four screws from the bottom plate), or a 9V DC power supply. As you can see by the label underneath the footswitch, this is a True Bypass pedal so it won’t interfere with your signal when switched off. It’s not as narrow and compact as the Xotic EP Booster, measuring about 4.4” wide.

Alright, so what does the Xotic RC Booster sound like? A more appropriate question would be what doesn’t it sound like! Its claim to fame is being one of the most - if not the most - transparent boost pedals money can buy. What this means in practical terms is that while using it to boost the level of your signal, it doesn’t introduce any of its own character or coloration. In our research, we found the majority of owners can attest to the fact that this is one of the cleanest clean boosts around. In our play testing, we started with all the knobs at noon and the Gain all the way down, and the RC Booster was nearly imperceptible. If you listen very closely you can discern a tiny amount of brightness/sparkle added, but for the most part it’s completely transparent at these settings. Dialed up to a subtle level (volume around unity, gain very low and the EQ flat), this is a great candidate for one of those pedals you always leave on in your setup, as it’s all but guaranteed to sweeten your tone.

The Treble and Bass EQ controls make this one of the most versatile boost pedals - certainly the most versatile of the five on our list. While not as granular as a dedicated EQ guitar pedal, the Treble and Bass are the icing on the boost cake, and help make the RC Booster a very functional multi-purpose tool. The Treble knob responds nicely, and can be used to brighten up a dull tone. The Bass knob is almost too responsive, as it makes your tone too boomy when cranked up past 2 o’clock. We suppose it’s better to have too much bass on tap, as opposed to too little. All in all, the EQ controls are very musical, and allow you to make micro-adjustments to really bring out the best of your guitar, amp, and other pedals. If you don’t have a separate EQ pedal, the RC Booster makes a great stopgap.

Bottom Line: The Xotic RC Booster should not be directly compared to the EP Booster. As we discussed, the EB Booster has a reputation for coloring your tone, whereas the RC is much more about transparency. For the control freaks, the Treble and Bass controls will allow you to sculpt your tone even further, and make a fantastic complement to the Gain and Volume knobs. By including four knobs, the RC Booster wins when it comes to versatility. If you value a super transparent boost pedal with added EQ controls, provided you can swing the relatively high price, you will not be disappointed adding this to your pedalboard. In terms of pro users, the RC is used by Two Door Cinema Club’s Alex Trimble, Billie Joe Armstrong, Doyle Bramhall II, Paul Gilbert, John Fogerty (he actually uses three of these), and more. Whether you use it as an “always on” pedal, or engage it just when you need a boost for solos, you’ll love how the Xotic RC Booster brings out the best of your amp.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

MXR Custom Audio Electronics MC-401 Boost

MXR MC401 Boost/Line Driver

A collaboration between MXR and Custom Audio Electronics, the MC-401 is quite simply a transparent boost with one knob, which gives you a range of 0 to +20dB. You can use it to make up for any kind of volume loss in an effects chain, to drive your amp a little more, or to stand out in the mix against other instruments come solo time.

This pedal features an attractive brushed finish. It requires 9V DC power (with a power adapter or you can access the battery by unscrewing the bottom plate), and has a curent draw of 1.5 mA.

What's great about the MC-401 is its simplicity. Lots of clean boosts out there add their own bit of character and EQ curve, but not the MC-401. It's just a one-knob volume boost, no more, no less. All this in a compact, elegant, and rugged little box by a trusted name.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

Keeley Katana

Keeley Katana Clean Boost Pedal

What happens when you build a clean boost pedal using the highest grade components available, and give it the option to have a transparent or colored boost? You get the Keeley Katana, of course.

The first thing to notice about the Katana, aside its white elegant looks, is the one and only knob is mounted on the side for easy adjustability with your foot (a pretty brilliant design feature, if you ask us). In normal operation, the dial transparently adds volume - it's your exact signal, just louder. Want some Keeley-flavored coloration? Pull the knob out, and now you have boost with a bit of gain. Not as much as an overdrive pedal has on tap; it's just short of that but enough to give you that "tubes on the edge of breakup" sort of tone. Sounds brilliant going into our Fender amps.

The Katana is certainly pricey for a boost - but there's a reason for that. It has a ton of headroom thanks to internal voltage doubling (takes your 9V power and doubles it to 18V). It also uses dual FETs (Field Effect Transistors), which without getting into the weeds means it can approximate tube-like tone.

So there you have it - a very simple to operate boost pedal with 2 very useful modes, built to the high standards of Keeley Electronics.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

TC Electronic Spark Mini Booster

TC Electronic Spark Mini Booster

Note: We tested the Spark Mini Booster, but TC Electronic also makes a larger Spark Booster. The boost circuit is the same, but the larger version features up to 26dB of boost, a two-band EQ, and a GAIN knob to dirty things up a bit.

The TC Electronic Spark Mini Booster is an extremely easy to use, one-knob transparent boost pedal with +20dB on tap, and an innovative "PrimeTime" feature. All that in a mini format that won't take up precious pedalboard real estate, and a price that won't drain your wallet.

The Spark Mini Booster is a rugged little box with a gold and white color scheme. It has a soft-click footswitch and true bypass to preserve your tone. The solitary LEVEL knob has a range between 0 and +20dB of boost.

The boost flavor here is... well, unflavored. It's transparent, and thus a viable option no matter if you're trying to stand out in a solo or push your drive pedals or amp.

A very interesting feature is "PrimeTime," which can be used to momentarily switch on the boost as you keep the footswitched pressed. As soon as you let go, the boost disengages. This is very useful if you just need the volume bump for small passages in your live playing.

Whether you need a subtle sparkle or a massive volume boost, the TC Electronic Spark Mini Booster will do the job admirably without altering your original tone. It's affordable, saves space on the pedalboard, and overall is a little gem of a boost pedal.

Available new on

AMAZON

Available used on

REVERB

What Is a Clean Boost?

A clean boosts is a pedal that will boost the volume of your guitar signal, with little to no tone coloration, or adding much if any distortion from the pedal. The only distortion that you should get would be from the amp overdriving itself because the pedal is pushing it so hard. So, if you’re a country guitar player, or like to play blues, a clean boost is essential to getting a great, sustaining lead tone, while maintaining a clean sounding signal, or just to push your amp a little bit farther for a more full sounding clean/mid gain rhythm tone.

It is also important to understand that the pedal itself is not the most important thing that dictates how clean sounding your clean boost will be; it is the pickups in your guitar, and the amp that you use. If your amp has high clean headroom, meaning that the amp won’t normally distort on its own until it is turned up really loud, like a Fender Twin Reverb, then your clean boost will stay clean longer, as opposed to if you were using an amp with lower clean headroom, like a JCM 800. If you use a low headroom amp, you will still notice some added distortion when stepping on your clean boost. That distortion will be mostly from the amp, and will still be considerably less added distortion than an overdrive pedal. Also, if you use lower output pickups, your clean boost will stay clean longer. Higher output pickups push the amp to distort more, so mixing higher output pickups with your boost will cause your clean boost to not be a pristine clean sound.


What Else can a Clean Boost Do?

It is important to realize though that your clean boost does not need to be perfectly pristinely clean. A perfectly clean and transparent boost pedal can be really useful for some sounds, like if you’re working on a country song with some chicken picking lead guitar. Sometimes though, the sound of a clean boost pushing an amp to distort with a guitar that has mid to high output pickups can give a very smooth, creamy sounding clean overdrive that is very hard to achieve with a standard overdrive pedal.


Why Buy a Clean Boost Instead of an Overdrive?

A clean boost has a bunch of benefits that are hard to get from your average overdrive pedal. First off, as said earlier, when a clean boost is pinned with a guitar that has medium to high output pickups, they can achieve a creamy sounding clean overdrive that is very hard to achieve with a standard overdrive pedal. Obviously there are some overdrives that can achieve this, but it is much easier to use a good clean boost. Also, a clean boost can allow you to get a clean sounding solo boost, which is very useful for blues, chicken picking country guitar, and many other genres/playing styles that is hard to get with an overdrive. Even with the gain knob really low, most overdrives still add a lot of color, and a bit of their own gain. Finally, clean boosts are great for when your amp is almost there in terms of tone. Overdrive pedals color your tone a lot, whereas good clean boosts are fairly transparent, and can be used to give your amp that little push to make your tone feel and sound better without coloring the tone too much.

And speaking of overdrive, a question we frequently see is if a clean boost should be placed before or after dirt pedals. This is a great question, and there’s not a single correct answer; it depends on what you want to achieve. If you place your boost before your dirt pedal, it will increase the amount of distortion. Some distortion and overdrive pedals love having a boost in front of them, and respond really well to that. Another benefit is if you’re playing quietly, placing the boost before the dirt pedal will get you more dirt at a low setting. If you want the boost to provide an increase in volume but not necessarily the amount of distortion/saturation, place it after your dirt pedal.


How We Tested These Boosts

To bring you the best boost pedals out there, we keep current and extensively research new products. We periodically review and revise this list as new pedals are released.

We ran these boosts through our tube amps, solid-states, and even headphone amplifiers. In terms of electric guitars, we used a variety of single-coil and humbucker pickups, as well as solid body, semi-hollow, and hollow body guitars.

In short, we listened to these boosts in as many signal chains as possible before formulating our opinions of them.

Some of the guitars and amplifiers we used to test these boost pedals
Some of the guitars and amplifiers we used to test these boost pedals.

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About the authors
Paul Kinman

Paul is a session guitar player who is also a two time BCCMA award winner and a final ballot 'Guitar Player of the Year' Nominee, and has played many large festivals, clubs, theatres, and arenas across the country, done many Radio/TV performances, and opened for artists such as, Thomas Rhett, Carrie Underwood, Randy Houser, Sam Hunt, High Valley, and many more. He is also endorsed by Prestige Guitars and Mission Engineering. Read more


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Comments 1

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kevmiller
kevmiller
116 over 2 years ago

MXR Micro Amp sounds perfect for guitar, bass and keyboard without sounding sterile. I've only seen three of them broken in 32 years. That's a pretty good record for repair service. I enjoy the cover of one of Moorhead's live albums that shows part of an MXR Micro Amp.