EQUIPBOARD GEAR REVIEWS

The 13 Best Delay Pedals - Reviews & Guide 2019

Best Delay Pedal
Calendar Icon
Updated September 2019
Pedal Icon
13 Pedals

Equipboard is the world's largest database of artists and the gear they use. Since 2013 we have been on a mission to bring you the best music gear for your money. Read about our review process.

Equipboard is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.

Equipboard is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.

WHY THIS ONE? BUYING OPTIONS
TC Electronic Flashback 2 DelayTC Electronic Flashback 2 Delay

The affordably-priced Flashback 2 shines when it comes to tonal versatility. TonePrint feature is well done, letting you download delays designed by pros. Throw in a 40 second looper, and you’ve got digital delay done to perfection.

Available new on

AMAZON

22 available used from $120.00 on

REVERB
MXR Carbon Copy Analog DelayMXR Carbon Copy Analog Delay

100% pure, warm analog delay, with an amazingly affordable price tag considering how good it sounds.

Available new on

AMAZON

95 available used from $79.99 on

REVERB
Boss DD-7 Digital DelayBoss DD-7 Digital Delay

The DD-7 offers a squeaky clean and long digital delay. It’s built like a tank and is used by countless pro artists.

Available new on

AMAZON

65 available used from $95.00 on

REVERB
Empress EchosystemEmpress Echosystem

Empress deliver an amazing boutique delay with astounding versatility from 12 algorithms which you can tweak parameters on all day long.

Available new on

AMAZON

13 available used from $345.00 on

REVERB
Donner Yellow Fall Vintage Pure Analog Delay Guitar Effect Pedal True BypassDonner Yellow Fall Vintage Pure Analog Delay Guitar Effect Pedal True Bypass

For a simple, no-frills delay, it’s hard to beat the Donner Yellow Fall Delay. Shockingly low price for a unit of this quality.

Available new on

AMAZON

4 available used from $15.59 on

REVERB
Line 6 DL4 Delay ModelerLine 6 DL4 Delay Modeler

Pristine digital delay, accurate modeling of 15 vintage delays and echoes, 14 second looper, and options for days. A bit pricey, but it’s no wonder the DL4 is one of the most ubiquitous guitar pedals.

Available new on

AMAZON

65 available used from $98.37 on

REVERB
Eventide TimeFactor Twin Delay Guitar Effects PedalEventide TimeFactor Twin Delay Guitar Effects Pedal

With dual independent delays that can be customized in millions of ways, the TimeFactor Twin is one of our absolute favorites if you want a full featured delay with a 12 second looper included.

Available new on

AMAZON

30 available used from $215.00 on

REVERB
Electro-Harmonix Stereo Memory Man with HazaraiElectro-Harmonix Stereo Memory Man with Hazarai

8 presets and a 30 second looper make this a good option if you don't need something as expansive as the Strymon or Eventide but still like a lot of bells and whistles from a great manufacturer.

Available new on

AMAZON

26 available used from $128.34 on

REVERB
Strymon TimeLine Delay PedalStrymon TimeLine Delay Pedal

With 200 presets and a 30 second looper that can run pre or post delay, this workstation many consider to be the gold standard of delays. Its tone and build quality are amazing, and it is absolutely worth the premium.

Available new on

AMAZON

34 available used from $359.00 on

REVERB
BOSS DD-500 Digital DelayBOSS DD-500 Digital Delay

Boss' DD-500 is the flagship delay from the legendary company and they have nailed it with 12 delay modes, an easy to read LED screen, MIDI interface, and looping capabilities.

Available new on

AMAZON

56 available used from $200.00 on

REVERB
Seymour Duncan Vapor Trail Analog DelaySeymour Duncan Vapor Trail Analog Delay

The Vapor Trail is a great analog delay that is true bypass and has great tones.

Available new on

AMAZON

12 available used from $99.00 on

REVERB
Electro-Harmonix Deluxe Memory BoyElectro-Harmonix Deluxe Memory Boy

A classic used by artists the world over, this analog delay is great for organic analog tones with tap tempo and modulation effects.

Available new on

AMAZON

20 available used from $100.00 on

REVERB
Earthquaker Devices Avalanche Run Stereo Delay and Reverb v2Earthquaker Devices Avalanche Run Stereo Delay and Reverb v2

This stereo reverb and delay combination creates absolutely beautiful modern delay sounds.

Available new on

AMAZON

9 available used from $249.00 on

REVERB

We’re here to help you figure out what the best guitar delay pedals are. If you’re thinking, “there is no such thing as the best pedal…” you are correct. Variety is the spice of a musician’s life, and there are dozens of great pedal options no matter what type of pedal you’re looking for. We aim to provide you with “can’t go wrong” delay pedal choices for different types of guitar players with varying budgets.

The Top Delay Pedals

TC Electronic Flashback 2 Delay

» The Flashback 2 shines when it comes to tonal versatility.

TC Electronic Flashback 2 Delay

Delay Type: Digital Delay
Max Delay Time: 6 seconds (40 seconds with the Flashback X4, and 7 seconds with the Flashback Mini)
Looper: Yes, 40 seconds

TC Electronic keeps making compelling pedals, and the trend continues with the TC Electronic Flashback 2 Delay and Looper Effect Pedal. Along with Line 6’s DL4, the Flashback 2 is one of those “do it all” delay pedals where versatility is the name of the game. An important thing to note is that the Flashback actually comes in 3 flavors. If you don’t need the looper functionality, then we strongly suggest you go with the budget-friendly Flashback Mini. Conversely, if you want more features and have the cash to spare, you’ll want to look at the larger Flashback X4.

The TC Electronic Flashback 2 is the second iteration of the super popular original Flashback delay pedal, and has all the features of its predecessor plus a few cool new ones, most notably the MASH footswitch control (more on that shortly). You can think of the Flashback 2 as a more compact Line 6 DL4. The lower right knob lets you select between seven built-in delay types: 2290, Analog, Tape, Dynamic, Modulation, Crystal (which has this shimmery/spacey thing going on), and Reverse; the 2290 setting is particularly highly praised as a fantastic clean delay.

One feature that makes the Flashback stand out from the rest is the TonePrint feature. All three versions of this pedal can be plugged into your computer via USB, and you can load in different delay settings supposedly made by the pros themselves. To get an idea of the various TonePrints available for the Flashback 2 Delay, go here. This feature could have definitely been a hindrance if not implemented correctly, but TC Electronic did a great job with it. Want a delay custom-made by Steve Morse or Omar Rodríguez-López? Plug in your pedal via USB, download the TonePrint, and start playing. It’s very easy and intuitive to use. You have three TonePrint slots available in this pedal, so while you’re playing you can switch between the three, as well as the normal built-in delay settings of course.

Another similarity with the DL4 is the inclusion of a looper, though the looper on the Flashback is not quite as good as the DL4’s. Think of it more as a bonus, rather than a core feature. The strength of the Flashback is the tonal versatility; there are definitely much better loopers out there. If looping is important to you, the relatively low price tag of the Flashback should leave you with cash leftover to grab a TC Electronic Ditto. That said, this pedal offers a generous 40 seconds of loop time.

The MASH feature is pretty interesting, and while your milage may vary in terms of how practical it is, we sure had fun playing with it. If you give the pedal’s footswitch a quick tap, it turns the pedal on and off (like any other stompbox). However, if you apply sustained pressure to the footswitch, it basically acts like an expression pedal. There’s an LED in the middle of the pedal that shines brighter the more pressure you apply, which in turn modulates the current delay sound more and more. It does some pretty cool things like infinitely hold your last delay repetition, change the pitch of the delays, apply a synth-like shimmer, and all sorts of other crazy modulations.

One minor annoyance of the Flashback 2 is tap-tempo is not built in - or rather, it’s not fully self contained. When you’re running the pedal mono, you’re able to use the stereo input jack to plug in a footswitch for tap-tempo.

As far as digital delays go, the sound quality of the TC Electronic Flashback is one of the best. It has made its way onto the pedalboards of the stars, including Joe Perry, Albert Lee, Troy Van Leeuwen, and Steve Morse.

Bottom line: The Flashback gets our wholehearted recommendation. If anything, the question is which of the siblings in the Flashback family should get a home on your pedalboard. If you want a versatile digital delay and decent looper without spending a ton of money, grab the Flashback 2. If you can do without the looper but still love the idea of a digital delay (and want to take advantage of the TonePrint feature), you’ll save about $50 by going with the Flashback Mini. If budget is not an issue, you can spare the room on your pedalboard, and you want a slightly more modern and superior sounding version of the DL4, we suggest you go with the Flashback X4.

Provided you don’t mind the digital flavor, it’s hard to argue this is not an outstanding pedal. For this many features packed into a single pedal, its outstanding sound, and value for the money, the Flashback is an absolute win.

TC Electronic Flashback Delay Pedal Family
TC Electronic Flashback Delay pedal series

Available new on

AMAZON

22 available used from $120.00 on

REVERB

MXR M169 Carbon Copy

» 100% pure, warm analog delay.

MXR Carbon Copy Analog Delay

Delay Type: Analog Delay
Max Delay Time: 600ms
Looper: No

The MXR Carbon Copy is a no-frills true analog delay pedal, and an outstanding one at that. Why no-frills? With analog pedals you tend to give up the bells and whistles like looping and tap tempo.

This is absolutely a pedal for those who appreciate analog tone. Owners of this pedal describe the sound as “organic,” “lush,” “full,” “subtle,” and having “warm tonal characteristics.” With the Carbon Copy you get up to 600 milliseconds of delay time. From a usability standpoint, people like the relatively large size of the knobs, making it easy to dial in settings with your toe as you’re playing. And speaking of control, there are 3 knobs to play with: REGEN controls the amount of delay/repeats, MIX controls the level of delay, and DELAY controls the rate (there is also a MOD button which toggles the modulation feature). Build quality is great; MXR knows what they’re doing in this department.

Of course, analog delay is not for everyone. Some people might prefer the clearer and crisper tone a digital delay such as the Flashback and Boss DD-7 provide. Analog delay is susceptible to coloration, since every repeat of the sound reuses the previous repeat.

Bottom Line: For as good of a pedal as the Carbon Copy is, the price is not at all unreasonable. While not in the super-budget range, keep in mind you’re paying for a pedal that is widely regarded as the best analog delay pedal, and has found its way onto countless pedalboards of the pros. Billie Joe Armstrong, Billy Gibbons, Zakk Wylde, and Brad Paisley have made room on their pedalboards for the Carbon Copy.

With dozens of positive endorsements by pros and casual players alike, hundreds of near-perfect ratings, and overwhelming approval from our panel of reviewers, the MXR Carbon Copy is a no-brainer for one of the best analog delay pedals out there.

Available new on

AMAZON

95 available used from $79.99 on

REVERB

Boss DD-7 Digital Delay

» A squeaky clean and long digital delay.

Boss DD-7 Digital Delay

Delay Type: Digital Delay
Max Delay Time: 6.4 seconds
Looper: Yes, 40 seconds

Boss has been making some of the best delay pedals for decades - DD-2, DD-3, DD-5, DD-6, DD-7, DD-20... enough choices to make your head spin. Luckily for us, they have outdone themselves with each new iteration. Case in point is the Boss DD-7 Digital Delay. We thought that the delay pedal was as good as it was going to get but Boss has made a great product even better.

First, we just have to say the DD-7 looks cool with its white, black and blue color scheme. It’s also practical, since it also allows the various lettering to stand out and be legible (the other pedals on this list suffer a bit in this regard). The DD-7 packs in quite a lot of features that we will get into shortly. Finally, coming to build quality, this is a pedal that has been built like a tank. This is common across almost all Boss products and the DD-7 can take a considerable amount of abuse before breaking down or suffering any significant damage.

As we mentioned earlier, Boss has a history of making great delay pedals and the DD-7 is no different. It has bettered its predecessors by offering up to 6.4 seconds of delay which is unheard of in a pedal. This really expands the possibilities and allows you to create some really unique and otherworldly tones. The delay also comes in two modes: modulation delay and analog delay. While modern music enthusiasts will love the modulation delay, classic music lovers will appreciate the analog delay.

Another useful feature is the stereo output capability of this pedal. This allows you to create some mind-bending stereo sweeping and panning effects which is unheard of in a pedal at this price point. The DD-7 is also very adaptable. You can connect it to an expression pedal and an external footswitch to control various parameters of the sound on the fly which can be a great boon when performing live. It can also send dry and wet signals at the same time making it equally at home on the stage and inside a recording studio. Finally, an onboard looper that can save sounds of up to 40 seconds in length is a very handy feature to have in such a compact and affordable package. The icing on the cake is that it is virtually noise free and produces one of the cleanest outputs we’ve experienced.

Getting the DD-7 to sound exactly like you want it to is pretty easy. There are four knobs that allow you to tailor the sound to a very fine level. The first knob E.LEVEL controls the effect level and is basically like a volume control. Set it at the 12 o clock position and you get the same level as the input sound and it can be reduced or increased from here. The second knob F.BACK is the feedback knob and this controls the number of time the delayed sound repeats itself. Keep in mind that this knob does not work when using the hold mode (i.e. looper). The third knob D.TIME is the one you will probably end up using a lot and it is the delay time knob, which unsurprisingly controls the amount of delay time. The last knob MODE allows you to select the various modes such as modulate, analog, reverse, etc.

No product can be perfect and as good as the DD-7 is, there are still some things it can do better:

  • Drains batteries quite quickly, but this can be mitigated by going with a power supply.
  • Operation is a little less intuitive than a similar digital pedal like the TC Flashback.
  • Difficult to change settings on the fly without using an expression pedal that has to be bought separately.

Bottom Line: There is no doubt that this is a rock-solid choice for a delay pedal, especially at this price point. It's that good and will last you for many years. Boss has a very long and rich history of delighting guitarists and the DD-7 proudly carries out that task with even more oomph. It's a mainstay on pro pedalboards - Josh Homme, Steve Vai, Joe Perry, Paul Banks of Interpol, Ryan Adams, and more.

Available new on

AMAZON

65 available used from $95.00 on

REVERB

Empress Effects Echosystem

» Astounding versatility from 12 algorithms which you can tweak parameters on all day long.

Empress Echosystem

The first thing that will grab your attention rather forcefully is the aesthetics of the Empress Effects Echosystem. It has gorgeous exterior that does justice to its insane capabilities. The light metallic color makes it look like an expensive piece of art rather than a piece of musical gear and for that matter. There is no screen but it is not much of an inhibition.

The initial learning curve will feel a bit tricky but once you spend an hour or so with this unit, everything will be clear as the light of day. The build quality is exceptional and this thing will withstand almost everything a guitarist will be able to throw at it in a regular use scenario. The LEDs light up beautifully and everything is clearly labelled and spaced out intelligently to allow for easy adjustments even when the lighting conditions wouldn’t seem conducive to it like on a dimly lit stage.

The Echosystem takes a more nuanced approach to the art of signal processing to give some of the best delay effects we have heard in sometime. Instead of a single algorithm driving the entire unit, the Empress Effects Echosystem has 12 separate algorithms. This makes each type of delay have its own unique and specific character. Another advantage of this approach is that the sound quality is simply breathtaking. It is quite easy to get lost in the depth and elegance of each of the single type of delay. Furthermore, it is quite customizable and flexible as well. Every parameter of the delay can be adjusted to a very fine degree and that allows you to create some really unique and personable sounds.

The sheer number of available delay effects is staggering too. Just to put this into perspective, there are 4 different tape delay effects alone. Overall, there are more than 36 types of delays in all which would take a lifetime to get through. You also have the option of saving 35 presets so that once you have a sound dialed in just right, you can save it for future use.

The one thing that the Echosystem offers that no one else is offering currently is constant firmware updates. Empress are very active on their forums and always lend an open ear to their users. In the rare occurrence of you finding an issue, chances are pretty high that it will be quickly fixed.

With highly convincing analog delay effects and some of the best digital delay effects, this pedal truly shines like a bright star. Add to that features like buffered bypass and full bypass and the Echosystem becomes a must-have component of every guitarist’s pedal board. The Empress Effects Echosystem is innovative and highly dependable and its flexible features make it a bonafide winner.

Available new on

AMAZON

13 available used from $345.00 on

REVERB

Donner Yellow Fall Delay

» A simple, no-frills delay with a shockingly low price.

Donner Yellow Fall Vintage Pure Analog Delay Guitar Effect Pedal True Bypass

Delay Type: Digital Delay, disguised as an Analog Delay.
Max Delay Time: 620ms
Looper: No

You won't believe how good the Donner Yellow Fall Delay sounds, especially when you see the price. You just can’t beat this for a simple delay pedal.

You get 3 knobs to play with: ECHO which controls the wet/dry mix, TIME lets you select 20-620ms delays, and FEEDBACK for the length of repetitions. Unfortunately the Echo and Feedback knobs are too small to be manipulated with your feet as you’re playing. This pedal is marketed as “True Bypass,” meaning it should not color your signal when inactive. Despite this claim, some users reported a slight bit of coloration, which we were not able to detect ourselves.

Some users have reported that this is not a true analog delay pedal, but rather a digital recreation. Still, it has drawn some comparisons to the analog tone of the MXR Carbon Copy, which is very high praise considering you can buy 4 of these for the price of one of those! Whether it’s true analog or not, it tends to sound darker than most digital delays, and the repeats are prone to artifacts from harmonic distortion, meaning Donner did a very good job with the sound.

Bottom Line: It’s easy to fall in love with this little pedal. Coming in at the lowest price and sporting a killer sound in a robust enclosure, we think this makes the perfect budget choice.

Available new on

AMAZON

4 available used from $15.59 on

REVERB

Line 6 DL4

» Pristine digital delay, 15 vintage delays and echoes, 14 second looper, and options for days.

Line 6 DL4 Delay Modeler

Delay Type: Digital Delay
Max Delay Time: 14 seconds
Looper: Yes, 14 seconds

The Line 6 DL4 is part delay pedal, part looper, and arguably Line 6’s most successful effect pedal. If you’re the type of person to look at the pedalboards of the pros, you don’t have to look long before spotting one of these green boxes in the wild (John Mayer, Coldplay’s Jonny Buckland, John Frusciante, Joe Perry, and Thom Yorke all use it, to name a few).

They call this a “delay modeler,” which means that because of the digital circuitry, it is able to model or replicate 15 vintage delay and echo effects (the left-most knob on this unit lets you select what delay to model). Sure, a purist in a studio setting might be able to tell that the DL4 does not replicate the true warmth and character of vintage analog delays… and if you’re that type of player, we suggest you own a true analog delay like the MXR Carbon Copy. The majority opinion is that the Line 6 DL4 is a fantastic sounding delay unit, and does justice to the delays it attempts to replicate.

The enclosure is rather large so be mindful of how much space you have on your pedalboard; but for the versatility it offers, it’s a small price to pay. Not only are all of the presets customizable with the DELAY TIME, REPEATS, TWEAK, AND TWEEZ knobs, but you have 3 programmable preset slots to save your custom settings, tap tempo, and an outstanding loop function (labeled the Loop Sampler).

It’s worth talking about the Loop Sampler - you get 14 seconds of memory to record your guitar playing, and loop it over and over. For instance, you can record a rhythm part, and play lead over it as it loops. You can continue to overdub more and more on your original loop, essentially becoming a one-man-band. While it’s not a perfect looper, and some users complain that the 14 seconds is a little short, it’s generally great for most users, and will save you from buying a separate looper pedal.

To address some of the negative feedback we uncovered, some users complain that the stomp switches are not the most sturdy. We personally owned one of these even before making this guide, and in years of use we’ve never had a problem (granted we don’t abuse our pedals to the max). Another gripe is the price, which some users feel is a bit on the high end. It’s by no means budget-priced, but we think considering how many features you get, the price is justified.

Bottom Line: While the price is bit steep, there’s a good reason this is one of the most popular pedals of all time. Its ability to model a host of vintage delays is second to none, and the 14 second looper is a pleasure to use.

Note: If you decide on the Line 6 DL4, you’ll need to buy the separate Line 6 PX-2 Power Supply, found here.

Available new on

AMAZON

65 available used from $98.37 on

REVERB

Eventide TimeFactor Twin

» Dual independent delays that can be customized in millions of ways.

Eventide TimeFactor Twin Delay Guitar Effects Pedal

Delay Type: Digital Delay
Max Delay Time: 3 seconds
Looper: Yes, 12 seconds

The great thing about modern electronics is that they can pack in hundreds of features in a tiny form factor and the Eventide TimeFactor Twin Delay Pedal is a great example of that. It is feature rich and has the ability to do some great delay effects right out of the box. Its biggest strength is the degree to which it can allow you to tweak and customize the sound without degrading the quality. There are two independent delays (hence the name Twin) that can each be up to 3 seconds.

Each delay can further be chosen from 10 awesome presets that are all very usable and can be used in stereo or mono mode. A 12-second looper, rugged build quality, true bypass, and the ability to connect to a computer via a USB port sweeten the deal even further.

You can update the software via USB, and also use Eventide’s H9 Control app to manage your delay presets. It is no doubt on the expensive side but well worth each penny if you crave the most tweakable digital delay out there.

Available new on

AMAZON

30 available used from $215.00 on

REVERB

Electro-Harmonix Stereo Memory Man with Hazarai

» 8 presets and a 30 second looper make this a good option from a great manufacturer.

Electro-Harmonix Stereo Memory Man with Hazarai

Delay Type: Digital Delay
Max Delay Time: 3 seconds
Looper: Yes, 30 seconds

The EHX Stereo Memory Man is a cool device that combines a capable delay pedal and a lengthy looper in a seamless manner and at a pretty decent price. The sounds you can get out of this pedal is matchless.

The reverse echo is a really cool feature which in combination with the 30 second looper can produce some really amazing sounds. The eight presets are programmable which allows you a great degree of tweaking.

It is a digital pedal which can be a sore point for analog enthusiasts, but this is one of the warmest sounding digital pedals and your audience will not have the slightest clue anyways. The sturdy metal construction, stereo operation, and true bypass complete this sweet package.

If you’re wondering what in the world Hazarai means like we were, this is according to founder of Electro-Harmonix Mike Matthews himself:

It means all the extra stuff. You know, give me a frank with all the Hazarai.

Available new on

AMAZON

26 available used from $128.34 on

REVERB

Strymon TimeLine

» 200 presets and a 30 second looper that can run pre or post delay make this the gold standard of delays.

Strymon TimeLine Delay Pedal

Looper: Yes, 30 seconds with the ability to run pre or post delay.

The brushed steel appearance gives this pedal a very distinguished and high end look. The layout is neat and the use of green LEDs is a genius move. The master selection knob abandons a notch or mark on the knob itself to point at an effect and instead uses individual LEDs for each effect with the selected effect’s LED glowing. This makes selecting effects easy even in dim lighting conditions. The exquisite build quality and its air of exclusivity makes it stand out from the crowd of delay pedals out there.

Using the Strymon Timeline Delay was very easy it was with no effort at all that I was able to make in-depth changes to the sound to get it to sound just right. The layout and the old-school LCD screen help immensely but it is the way everything is structured that anyone with even the most rudimentary knowledge of how delay works will be able to make this pedal to sing to their tunes. There are at least 8 parameters that you can tweak for each effect to a very minute degree and then save it on one of the 200 memory locations to call it back when needed. There are so many possibilities with the sound that your own creativity will be what ultimately puts any obstacles in front of you.

Its connectivity options are great too including MIDI capabilities. You can connect a MIDI controller to it to make switching between the presets quite easy. An expression pedal can also be connected to precisely control certain parameters while playing live. Overall, this is one of the most intuitive and easy to use feature-loaded delay pedals that we came across.

The analog sounds that the Strymon Timeline Delay produces puts it into the upper echelon of delay pedals on sale right now. They are as warm and colorful as a true analog pedal’s sound.

It is a solidly built unit and even the most enthusiastic guitarist will have a tough time putting a dent into this beauty. The build quality is just so exceptional and everything looks and feels exquisite. Turning the knob gives a satisfactory response and that brings us to how easy it is to use. Do not get us wrong. This delay pedal is loaded to the hilt with features including a looper but the way everything is laid out and managed seems so organic that even amateur guitarists will be able to set up the Strymon Timeline Delay without any issues. This is a very capable delay pedal that can make you happy irrespective of which effect type you have your mind set on. If you want a truly amazing delay pedal that can handle analog effects with aplomb few pedals are as good as this one.

Available new on

AMAZON

34 available used from $359.00 on

REVERB

Boss DD-500

» 12 delay modes, an easy to read LED screen, MIDI interface, and looping capabilities.

BOSS DD-500 Digital Delay

The DD-500 is Boss' flagship delay pedal. At its heart it is a multimode delay pedal but it actually is a lot more versatile and customizable than your average delay pedal. If you are looking for the ultimate delay pedal that money can buy then the Boss DD-500 should absolutely be on your short list.

As soon as you lay your eyes upon the Boss DD-500, you will realize that it is a premium product. It somehow manages to look powerful yet quite simple at the same time. You will not feel at all intimidated by this device. Everything is very neatly laid out and operating it is very intuitive. There is a main knob to the left of the screen which you can use to select a particular type of delay. Examples include shimmer, tape, dual, Tera Echo, slow, SFX, and so many more. Having the sounds of all these delay types available so easily is great but you might ask what is so special about them. It is their authenticity and the level of customizability that truly makes them shine. You can choose to modify many parameters to get the delay to sound just right. You can then save these on one of the banks for easy access later. The crisp and clear screen helps in this regards quite a lot. The phrase looper capability is another wonderful addition to this pedal.

Coming to the actual sound quality, it is just so sweet and full of life. This is technical wizardry at its best and I can’t imagine how Boss are going to better this one as it is damn near perfect. There is almost no noise and the build quality is excellent which allows you to play passionately without having to worry about damaging your precious and rather expensive pedal. The DD-500 is the closest a digital pedal has come to replicating the warmth of an analog delay pedal.

The stereo on this device isn’t true stereo which can be a bit annoying if you really want to get into heavy mixing. The lack of an inbuilt expression pedal also seems like an oversight. Apart from these minor quirks for which you can find workarounds, there is very little to complain about regarding the Boss DD-500.

Available new on

AMAZON

56 available used from $200.00 on

REVERB

Seymour Duncan Vapor Trail

» Great analog delay that is true bypass and has terrific tones.

Seymour Duncan Vapor Trail Analog Delay

Delay Type: Analog Delay
Max Delay Time: 600ms
Looper: No

While being a revered name among guitarists, Seymour Duncan is known mostly for their pickups. They, however, have produced a few great pedals and the Vapor Trail is one of them. The great thing about this pedal is that it manages to achieve with perfection what many of its peers fail to achieve - produce an authentic vintage delay sound.

Another cool feature is the ability to mix the wet and dry signal precisely by using an external expression pedal. The downside to this pedal is that it is highly focused doing one thing and that is delivering a vintage sound, so if you’re looking for variety then this isn’t the best pedal for you.

By analog delay standards the price is quite affordable though which means that you can use it as a specialty pedal. Despite using an analog BBD chip, it is noise-free which usually happens to be the biggest problem traditionally associated with an analog circuit.

Another huge plus is the flashing light synced with the delay time - very useful when jamming with other musicians. While this pedal might not be for everyone, those looking for a smooth vintage sound will absolutely love the Vapor Trail. To top it all off, the color scheme and paint job is beautiful.

Available new on

AMAZON

12 available used from $99.00 on

REVERB

Electro-Harmonix Deluxe Memory Boy

» Organic analog tones with tap tempo and modulation effects.

Electro-Harmonix Deluxe Memory Boy

Delay Type: Analog Delay
Max Delay Time: 700ms
Looper: No

Analog delay pedals are mostly pretty simple. By providing you loads of features and a very precise control over the depth and rate of delay, the Electro-Harmonix Deluxe Memory Boy bucks that trend. An external expression pedal can enhance this control even further, and we definitely recommend one.

It is a completely analog pedal and allows you to get a warm, somewhat dark and deep delay that can vary from subtle to mesmerizing. It sort of takes on a life of its own which can easily take you to Radiohead-ish territory, so if you’re looking for a more bright and clinical delay it’s best that you look elsewhere.

The tap tempo and subdivision selection is a game changer, and its inclusion is unheard of at this price point. If a very tweakable analog delay is what you’re after, this is one of the best pedals on the market for the money. Think of it like an MXR M169 Carbon Copy or Seymour Duncan Vapor Trail on steroids.

Available new on

AMAZON

20 available used from $100.00 on

REVERB

EarthQuaker Devices Avalanche Run V2

» Stereo reverb and delay combination creates absolutely beautiful modern delay sounds.

Earthquaker Devices Avalanche Run Stereo Delay and Reverb v2

Delay Type: Digital Delay
Max Delay Time: 2 seconds
Looper: No

Rarely does a pedal get the name, looks and the features just right but when it happens, it is magical as is the case with the EarthQuaker Devices Avalanche Run V2. This is one of the most feature-rich pedal that offers both reverb and delay effects in the same enclosure.

It’s important to note that this is not your everyday “vanilla” type of digital delay pedal. The reverb/delay combo and that intangible EarthQuaker Devices “magic” makes the Avalanche Run V2 sound a certain way which you will either like or hate; if you happen to be in the former group - like us - then you are in for a treat (have a listen for yourself and try not to fall for this pedal).

The reverb alone makes this a truly awesome pedal but add the delay capabilities and this is a great option if you want to build a minimalist pedal board. Sadly, the Avalanche Run isn’t great at producing classic and vintage sounds but is the perfect companion for anyone into modern, experimental, or ambient soundscapes.

Available new on

AMAZON

9 available used from $249.00 on

REVERB

What Does a Delay Pedal Do?

Though the means of achieving the effect can get a bit complicated at times, the actual function of a delay pedal is pretty simple. Essentially, all the pedal really does is play back the notes that you’ve played. A good example of this effect would be something like guitar riff in the opening of Sublime’s April 26, 1992 or the majority of the lead guitar work of U2’s guitarist The Edge.

However, this effect also has a few other interesting uses. For example, when set to more subtle settings delay can work wonders in filling out your lead tone for solos. This technique is actually commonly used in almost every genre, though it seems to be most common in country.

Also, a delay pedal opens up a lot of interesting uses when used as a way to enhance rhythm guitar work. For example, when using Jimi Hendrix-esque barre chords (F-Major shape with the thumb wrapped around the neck to hit the bass note on the 6th string) you can have a sound almost similar to a bass player and rhythm guitar player working in close conjunction. That technique offers up a lot of flexibility in what your rhythm section can accomplish, as it gives the bass guitarist more room to emphasize certain intervals in the song.

What to Look for in a Delay Pedal

While the things that apply to shopping for other pedals apply here as well (build quality, size, features, cost), perhaps the biggest consideration is akin to one of the greatest debates in audio of all time; analog vs. digital.

Analog vs. Digital Delay: As you probably guessed, this has to do with the circuitry that’s causing the delay to happen.

Digital Delay is controlled by a computer chip, i.e. pure logic, 1’s and 0’s. It’s a more perfect delay, since it’s algorithmic. Digital adds no coloration to the sound. Whether this is a good or bad thing depends on the guitarist; sometimes we want a pure unadulterated sound, and sometimes we want some dirt and artifacts. Objectively, the benefits of digital delays are much longer delay times, and more versatility, i.e. the delays can be processed with other effects like reverse echo, stereo delay, tap tempo, looping, etc.

Analog Delays have more character, but are less perfect. If you think of the delay time as a clock, every repeat of the sound reuses the previous repeat, thus potentially introducing coloration and imperfections. Also, delay times are going to be shorter. Some guitar players seek this out, claiming analog delays have, “natural dark and murky warmth to them that really thickens up your signal.” Depending what signal you are feeding into your delay pedal, you might want to avoid analog. For instance, if you’re feeding it a big/thick or distorted sound, the harmonics will have to be reproduced on every repeat, and this can cause some unpleasant results.

It comes down to personal taste, and your existing rig. If you have a relatively clean signal and don’t need an immensely long delay, analog might be preferable since it will add some character and warmth. If on the other hand you want long delays, or are feeding a very dirty signal into your delay pedal, you might opt for a digital delay that won’t introduce any unwanted surprises with every repeat. Still not satisfied? We go into more depth on this topic in this article and video.

Versatility: An analog delay pedal tends to be simpler, i.e. it just serves as a delay pedal. Digital delay pedals have the advantage of offering more features - looping, reverse, tap tempo to name a few. This is exactly why you’ll often see guitarists recommend that you have both types of delay pedals on your pedalboard; analog for quality and warmth, and digital for the versatility and bells & whistles.

Looper: It’s not uncommon for digital delay pedals to include a looping function. A looper allows you to record anything for a specificed amount of time, which will just be repeated (looped) over and over. For instance you can record a rhythm riff, loop it and then play lead over it. It’s how musicians like Ed Sheeran can become a one-man band. If you want to seriously get into looping, we recommend a dedicated looper pedal (we have a guide to choosing the best looper pedal here). But if you just want to play around with it or are ok with shorter loops, you’ll appreciate the loop function included with many digital delay pedals.

Build Quality and Size: How important delay is to your style and sound will dictate if you need to pay close attention to build quality and size of the pedal. As with any pedal you shop for, if you’re going to be playing live and stomping on it night after night you’ll want to make sure it can take a good beating and remain functional. A less robust build quality usually means a much more affordable pedal, so make sure that’s something you really require. Regarding size, the more feature-laden a delay pedal is, the larger it will be (thus taking up more space on your pedalboard), and typically more expensive. One of the pedals we recommend actually comes in three different size variations.

Cost: Price can often be the deciding factor, so we made sure to select pedals in different price ranges. Whether you’re looking for a starter delay pedal, or something to invest in and keep on your pedalboard for years to come, our picks have you covered with some options.


How We Tested Delay Pedals

We’ve got several guitarists on Equipboard’s editorial team, and boy do we love pedals! To bring you the best delay pedals out there, we keep current and extensively research new products. We periodically review and revise this list as new pedals are released.

We ran these delays through our tube amps, solid-states, and even headphone amplifiers. In terms of electric guitars, we used a variety of single-coil and humbucker pickups, as well as solid body, semi-hollow, and hollow body guitars.

For this particular test, we had an Orange Crush 30 watt combo amp (which has a nice clean channel that takes pedals very well), and a Fender Hot Rod DeVille 60 watt combo amp. We tested with many guitars, but with delay the choice of guitar matters a little less. For the record, we used a Gibson ES-325, a Gibson Bill Kelliher Golden Axe Explorer, and a Tele Custom.

Some of the guitars and amplifiers we used to test these delay pedals
Some of the guitars and amplifiers we used to test these delay pedals.

Delay Pedals That Didn't Make the Cut

As we test delay pedals, not all of them make the cut. We'll make notes of those here.

Fender Mirror Image Delay

Fender Mirror Image Delay
The Mirror Image Delay looks great. The blue LED is extremely bright and makes the labels of the controls hard to read.

The Mirror Image Delay is interesting. It's not the most traditional delay pedal, in that there's simply not a whole lot of delay on tap. Instead, the Mirror Image seems to focus more on layering other effects on top of the delay.

Honestly that's the biggest detractor in our eyes; to have a fraction of the delay available in other pedals you need to set the LEVEL (i.e. wet/dry mix) and FEEDBACK knobs all the way up.

That said, the Mirror Image can be fun. It has three delay modes, DIGITAL, ANALOG & TAPE, and each has two subtle variations. The DEPTH and RATE knobs let you dial in a hybrid pitch modulation/warble/flange type quality to the delay repeats.

Unfortunately Fender's Mirror Image Delay sits somewhere in No Man's Land with a delay that's lacking and other effects that you'd be better off buying individual pedals for, or a multi-fx unit.


Which Delay Pedals Are Used by the Most Pro Artists?

Ever wonder what your favorite artists have on their pedalboards? Well, we crunched the numbers on Equipboard to reveal some fun facts about the most used delay pedals.

1. Line 6 DL4

Line 6 DL4 Delay Modeler


2. Boss DD-3

Boss DD-3 Digital Delay

  • Matt Bellamy's DD-3 can be seen up close here, along with his knob settings for the songs Micro Cuts, Map of the Problematique, and Hysteria.
  • Dave Grohl has a Boss DD-3 on this version of his pedalboard.
  • Slash's DD-3 can be seen at 5:35 of this video detailing his signal chain. His guitar tech says, "...they work, they sound the way we're looking for, real simple. Got about two places I use it in the set right now, and you know, good delay."

3. MXR Carbon Copy

MXR Carbon Copy Analog Delay

  • Wayne Sermon's BiLT Relevator guitar has a built-in MXR Carbon Copy, as he details in his Rig Rundown.
  • Joe Perry's MXR Carbon Copy can be seen in this video rundown of his pedals, used for a "quick slap delay."
  • Billy Gibbons' guitar tech shows he uses an MXR Carbon Copy delay in his Rig Rundown, used for "a slap."

And for the boutique delay pedals most used by pros:

Strymon TimeLine

Strymon TimeLine Delay Pedal

Users include: John Mayer, Noel Gallagher, Eric Johnson, Chris Shiflett (Foo Fighters)

Strymon El Capistan dTape Echo

Strymon El Capistan dTape Echo Delay Pedal

Users include: Dan Auerbach, Joe Perry, Jeff Beck, Billy Corgan

Eventide TimeFactor

Eventide TimeFactor Twin Delay Guitar Effects Pedal

Users include: John Mayer, Russell Lissack (Bloc Party), John Petrucci, Peter Frampton

Maestro Echoplex

Maestro Echoplex

Users include: Mike Campbell, Albert Lee, Eric Johnson, Eddie Van Halen

Red Panda Lab Particle Granular Delay

Red Panda Lab Particle Granular Delay

Users include: Josh Klinghoffer (Red Hot Chili Peppers), Brad Delson (Linkin Park), Troy Van Leeuwen (Queens of the Stone Age)


Want Gear Rec’s Based on Your Fav Artists?

Gear Recommender Image »Try Our Gear Recommender
About the authors
Michael Pierce

Michael bought his first guitar, a Fender California Series Stratocaster in Candy Apple Red, in 1998. He likes rock of all types, from classic to punk to metal. Michael co-founded Equipboard to satisfy his curiosity around what gear his guitar heroes use. Read more

Giulio Chiarenza

Giulio co-founded Equipboard with his friend Michael. He plays the piano, guitar, drums, and had a brief stint signed to a label as an electronic music producer. Read more


You Might Also Enjoy These Gear Guides


Comments 6

Sign Up or Log In to add comments
+2
research
research
1 about 4 years ago

Hey, Thanks for this article. Really this Goods are very informative and helpful for me. and It is beneficial for my guitar and my website.

Thanks.

+2
starguitar
starguitar
1210 almost 4 years ago

Loved this guide, super helpful, thank you! I think you convinced me to keep my Line6 DL4, and sell my Boss DD-6 (at least I think that's the one I have) in favor of a MXR Carbon Copy so I can experience some of that analog delay goodness everyone seems to be so fond of ;)

+1
markanderic
markanderic
416 over 3 years ago

Has anyone tried the T-Rex Replicator Tape Echo? Other than the price tag is it a good pedal?

+1
jason_ring
jason_ring
131 over 2 years ago

I have two Strymon pedals (Orbit dBucket Flanger and the Blue Sky Reverberator) and they are fantastic......I can imagine that the delay pedal is just as great. Knocking it for the price? Yeah, I know Strymon is steep, but their pedals are worth the money you put into them. I'd probably get the El Capistan if I already didn't have a great combo in my Boss DD-5 and EHX Deluxe Memory Man. I love the combo of the digital with Analog........I actually like my DMM as well as your "best of the best" pick. It's got the chorus and vibrato modulation with a couple more bells and whistles than the MXR Carbon Copy.. Regardless, thanks for the article.

+2
onetrickpony
onetrickpony
176 about 2 years ago

Great read but having a Line6 M9 which really is a DL4 plus. I find the Flashback more a value and more versatile if not better sounding. I should own a Flashback 4 which is even with the DL4 in price and options. For flexibility I am using the Flashback and Flashback mini. With the TonePrint software I can deep edit my delays to sound like I want to hear them. Sure this can be done on the DL4 but the TonePrint software is so much easier. The DL4 has a darker tone impact on the overall tone compared to the Flashback which also seems to be more articulate than the DL4. Thanks for the article as it was fun to read.

+3
dannfeltrin
dannfeltrin
648 8 months ago

I share links from Equipboard to my students all the time, and the one I can say everyone likes the most (including myself!) is this one article about delays. Thanks for helping the guitar community around the globe! \m/